Home > Eating & Drinking > Great Pear Recipes

Great Pear Recipes

By: Elizabeth Hinds - Updated: 27 Sep 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Great Pear Recipes

Although pears are available all year round, it’s during late summer and autumn that the home-grown varieties come into their own. Delicious instead of apple in a ploughman’s lunch, pears have a natural affinity for cheese.

Eat as it is with a chunk of mature cheddar, or serve ripe pear sprinkled with crumbled stilton and a little French dressing as a refreshing starter. Or try one of our delicious and simple dessert recipes.

Baked Pears

  • 4 pears, firm and not too ripe
  • 2-3 tablespoons Demerara sugar
  • Butter

Preheat the oven to 200ºC, gas mark 6. Butter a shallow wide baking dish.

and halve the pears. Scoop out the core and remove the stalk. Place cut-side down in one layer in the prepared baking dish. Sprinkle with the demerara sugar and put a dot of butter on each pear half. Lightly butter a sheet of greaseproof paper to cover the dish and bake for about 20-30 minutes or until the pears are tender.

Serve straight from the oven with cold pouring cream or ice cream.

  • Conference pears are a good variety for baking.

Pears in red wine

  • 1 bottle red wine
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Nutmeg
  • Zest of an orange
  • 2 tablespoon redcurrant jelly
  • 200g demerara sugar
  • 6 firm pears

Preheat the oven to 150ºC, gas mark 2.

Place the wine in a casserole dish (with a tightly-fitting lid) along with the stick of cinnamon, a grating of nutmeg, the zest of the orange, redcurrant jelly and sugar. Bring to the boil and allow to simmer while you prepare the pears.

Peel the pears and trim off the base of the core leaving the bottom of the pear flat but the stalks still attached. Add the pears to the simmering liquid, cover with the lid and bake in the oven for 1½ – 2 hours or until the pears are tender.

Remove the pears and arrange upright on a serving dish. Bring the liquid back to the boil and reduce to a syrup. Pour over the pears.

Serve warm or cold with lots of pouring cream.

  • This can be made up to 2 days in advance, allowed to cool and kept in the fridge.
  • Use plump pears e.g. William pears.
  • Don’t be tempted to use very cheap wine: the better the wine, the better the pudding.

Pear and Ginger Upside Down Cake

  • 2 cans pear halves (about 900g altogether)
  • 8 tablespoons stem ginger, finely chopped
  • 8 tablespoons syrup from the stem ginger jar
  • 175g self-raising flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 175g soft light brown sugar
  • 175 g butter, softened
  • 3 eggs

Preheat the oven to 180ºC, gas mark 4. Grease and line a 20 cm round tin. Grease the lining paper.

Place a little chopped ginger in the indentation in each pear half and arrange, carefully, flat-side down in the tin. Spoon half the ginger syrup over the pears.

Sieve the flour, baking powder and ground ginger together into a bowl. Mix in the sugar. Stir in the butter and lightly beaten eggs and mix well to make a smooth batter. Carefully spoon the cake mixture over the pears and level it off.

Bake for about 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean.

Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes and then turn out onto a cooling tray. Remove the lining paper and allow to finish cooling.

Sprinkle over any remaining stem ginger pieces and drizzle over the rest of the syrup.

  • Served warm with custard this makes a lovely pudding.
  • You can buy jars of stem ginger in most supermarkets and specialist stores.

Pear Chutney

  • Olive oil
  • 200g sultanas
  • 100g raisins
  • 100g Demerara sugar
  • 400ml malt or cider vinegar
  • 800g pears, peeled cored and diced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Wash jars and place in a warm oven to heat while you’re making the chutney.

Heat a generous dollop of oil in a saucepan and add the sultanas, raisins and sugar. Fry lightly until the fruits starts to caramelise. Watch it doesn’t burn!

Add the vinegar and bring to the boil. Boil for 3 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients, return to the boil and simmer gently until most of the liquid has evaporated. Stir frequently to prevent sticking and burning. When you’re happy with the consistency spoon into the hot jars and seal while still warm. Store in the fridge.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Latest Comments
  • Joe
    Re: Cherry Trees
    I have a cherry tree in my garden called MARILO. Is it edible, if so is it sweet or sour
    18 December 2018
  • Joe
    Re: Cherry Trees
    My wife purchased a cherry tree called MARILO and never recorded what type it was before she passed away. Could you tell me if it is edible and if so…
    18 December 2018
  • Dekzion
    Re: Growing Goji Berries
    We've had the standard red Goji for years, it's in full sun, just one plant, never gets pruned (unless there's bits sticking out and get in…
    16 December 2018
  • gordan
    Re: Growing Avocados
    hello to you, i,m growing up to 20 avocado's but one of them as some leave starting to go brown why is that it gets good feed wone's a week but…
    12 December 2018
  • Beth
    Re: The Health Benefits of Eating Fruit
    I think fruits and vegetables are really healthy and that everyone should eat it or at least eat whichever fruits or…
    7 November 2018
  • Pottie
    Re: Growing Avocados
    My avo trees have been moved indoors and are doing well buy looks like someting is having a feed on it at night and then the leaves turn brown. I…
    3 November 2018
  • Katrina
    Re: Growing Berries
    Why are blackberry bushes flowering in October. Would be grateful if you could tell me the answer. Thanks Katrina
    26 October 2018
  • Trullimad
    Re: Plum Trees
    I bought a mature plum tree from a nursery a year ago. I say "mature" because its trunk is approx. 8 inches in diameter. It produced one plum this summer…
    15 October 2018
  • Mana
    Re: Orange Trees
    About a year ago we bought a house in Scottsdale, AZ where there is an orange tree.Last season there were many oranges on the ground with a hole on…
    2 October 2018
  • Kaycee
    Re: Growing Grapes
    Please I would like to know if there are Nigerian grape farmers here and I'll like to meet you. Thanks.
    29 September 2018